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  • Helmer Oddershede posted an update 1 week, 3 days ago

    That is why it is important to have your body utilize the sugar properly and get it out of your bloodstream.When your blood sugar is too low, your doctor refers to it as hypoglycemia. Having low blood sugar can be very dangerous and patients taking medication for diabetes should watch for symptoms of low blood sugar. It is also important that your monitor your blood sugar regularly to avoid both low as well as high blood sugar. It is important that you keep your blood sugar as close to normal as possible at all times.How does my doctor know if I am keeping my blood sugar under control? Some patients are may not follow the proper diet and exercise except for the days leading up to a blood test in the doctor’s office. They want to look like they are doing a good job controlling their blood sugar. This way their fasting blood glucose test results will be good for the doctor. But, there is a test that will show your doctor the real picture over the past 3 months or so. It is called the hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) test. Hemoglobin is the part of your blood, or red cells, that carries oxygen to your cells. Glucose sticks to the hemoglobin in your red cells of the blood as they emerge from the bone marrow where they are made.The amount of sugar on the red cell is proportionate to the blood sugar level at the moment the red cell goes into circulation, and remains at that level for the life of the red cell. So if there has been a lot of extra glucose in your blood, there will be a lot of glucose stuck all over your hemoglobin. Since the average lifespan of the hemoglobin in your blood is 90-100 days, a HbA1C test shows a doctor how well you have been controlling your blood sugar over the last 3 months. This test is a check on the overall sugar control, not just the fasting blood sugar. So it is important to control your blood sugar at all times, and not just before visiting the doctor. The most important reason to control your blood sugar is so that you can live a longer, healthier life without complications that can be caused by not controlling your diabetes.What happens if I do not control my diabetes? The complications of diabetes can be devastating. Both forms of diabetes ultimately lead to high blood sugar levels, a condition called hyperglycemia. The damage that hyperglycemia causes to your body is extensive and includes:Damage to the retina from diabetes (diabetic retinopathy) is a leading cause of blindness.Diabetes predisposes people to high blood pressure and high cholesterol and triglyceride levels. These independently and together with hyperglycemia increase the risk of heart disease, kidney disease, and other blood vessel complications.Damage to the nerves in the autonomic nervous system can lead to paralysis of the stomach (gastroparesis), chronic diarrhea, and an inability to control heart rate and blood pressure with posture changes.Damage to the kidneys from diabetes (diabetic nephropathy) is a leading cause of kidney failure.Damage to the nerves from diabetes (diabetic neuropathy) is a leading cause of lack of normal sensation in the foot, which can lead to wounds and ulcers, and all too frequently to foot and leg amputations.Diabetes accelerates atherosclerosis or “hardening of the arteries”, and the formation of fatty plaques inside the arteries, which can lead to blockages or a clot (thrombus), which can then lead to heart attack, stroke, and decreased circulation in the arms and legs (peripheral vascular disease).Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs from time to time in most people with diabetes. A diagnosis of diabetes is made if your blood glucose reading is 126 mg/dl or higher. (In 1997, the American Diabetes Association lowered the level at which diabetes is diagnosed to 126 mg/dl from 140 mg/dl.)A “random” blood glucose test can be taken at any time.

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